2022 Volume 9 Issue 2

Larval Food Analysis and Qualitative Determination of Exoenzyme-Producing Gut Bacteria in Adult Ceratopogonid Midges (Diptera)


Shubhranil Brahma, Somnath Chatterjee, Gouri Sankar Pal, Niladri Hazra
Abstract

Biting midges are small nematocerous Diptera. Culicoides and Dasyhelea are two important genera of the family Ceratopogonidae. Larvae of Culicoides innoxius and Dasyhelea aprojecta are found in the semiaquatic moist habitat. The larvae feed on the small debris and habitat substrata. The materials consumed by these larvae aid in their development to become adult. The nutritional evaluation of the food material of larvae of C. innoxius and D. aprojecta was carried out to know the essential elements for their development. In the case of adult Culicoides, many species are hematophagous. However, the adult midges of the genus Dasyhelea are dependent on nectar and honeydew. Along with their digestive enzymes, exoenzyme-producing gut associated bacteria have also an important role in the digestion of these food materials. Digestion and metabolism of these food materials aid in insect maturation, immunity, reproduction, maintaining diapause, etc. Qualitative determination of the gut associated bacteria of adult C. innoxius and D. flava was accomplished to infer the role of bacteria supplementing the digestive enzymes.


How to cite this article
Vancouver
Brahma S, Chatterjee S, Pal GS, Hazra N. Larval Food Analysis and Qualitative Determination of Exoenzyme-Producing Gut Bacteria in Adult Ceratopogonid Midges (Diptera). Entomol Appl Sci Lett. 2022;9(2):38-47. https://doi.org/10.51847/Mau7kaey1Q
APA
Brahma, S., Chatterjee, S., Pal, G. S., & Hazra, N. (2022). Larval Food Analysis and Qualitative Determination of Exoenzyme-Producing Gut Bacteria in Adult Ceratopogonid Midges (Diptera). Entomology and Applied Science Letters, 9(2), 38-47. https://doi.org/10.51847/Mau7kaey1Q

Larval Food Analysis and Qualitative Determination of Exoenzyme-Producing Gut Bacteria in Adult Ceratopogonid Midges (Diptera)

 

Shubhranil Brahma1, Somnath Chatterjee2, Gouri Sankar Pal2, Niladri Hazra2*

 

1Department of Zoology, Durgapur Women's College, Durgapur, West Bengal, India.

2Department of Zoology, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan, West Bengal, India.


ABSTRACT

Biting midges are small nematocerous Diptera. Culicoides and Dasyhelea are two important genera of the family Ceratopogonidae. Larvae of Culicoides innoxius and Dasyhelea aprojecta are found in the semiaquatic moist habitat. The larvae feed on the small debris and habitat substrata. The materials consumed by these larvae aid in their development to become adult. The nutritional evaluation of the food material of larvae of C. innoxius and D. aprojecta was carried out to know the essential elements for their development. In the case of adult Culicoides, many species are hematophagous. However, the adult midges of the genus Dasyhelea are dependent on nectar and honeydew. Along with their digestive enzymes, exoenzyme-producing gut associated bacteria have also an important role in the digestion of these food materials. Digestion and metabolism of these food materials aid in insect maturation, immunity, reproduction, maintaining diapause, etc. Qualitative determination of the gut associated bacteria of adult C. innoxius and D. flava was accomplished to infer the role of bacteria supplementing the digestive enzymes.

Keywords: Culicoides, Dasyhelea, Larval food material, Proximate composition, Exoenzyme-producing gut bacteria, Qualitative determination.


 


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Entomology and Applied Science Letters is an international peer reviewed publication which publishes scientific research & review articles related to insects that contain information of interest to a wider audience, e.g. papers bearing on the theoretical, genetic, agricultural, medical and biodiversity issues. Emphasis is also placed on the selection of comprehensive, revisionary or integrated systematics studies of broader biological or zoogeographical relevance. Papers on non-insect groups are no longer accepted. In addition to full-length research articles and reviews, the journal publishes interpretive articles in a Forum section, Short Communications, and Letters to the Editor. The journal publishes reports on all phases of medical entomology and medical acarology, including the systematics and biology of insects, acarines, and other arthropods of public health and veterinary significance.
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